Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality

South Africa
Summary
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  • image description
     
    Population 4012441
  • km 2
    Area 2445.0
  • ZAR
    GDP 390 Billion
  • emission
    Targets by Reduce 13% GHG emissions
Targets

Targets by Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality

GHG emissions reduction targets

 

    Community
     

  • The Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality has committed to reduce its Community emissions by 13% by 2020 compared to Baseline scenario (BAU) reduction target emission level.
  • The target is going to be reached by activities in Stationary energy and Transport sectors.

 

    Renewable energy target

     

    • The Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality committed to increase its share of renewable energy in final energy mix in Community by 0% by 2020
    • The target is going to be reached by activities in sectors.
    • The Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality committed to increase its share of renewable energy in final energy mix in Community by 0% by 2020
    • The target is going to be reached by activities in Electricity, Heating & cooling and Industry sectors.
    • The Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality committed to increase its Installed capacity of Renewable energy in Community to 0 MW by 2020
    • The target is going to be reached by activities in Heating & cooling and Industry sectors.
    •  

    Energy efficiency target

     

    10565000% Energy efficiency improvement by 2022

    • The Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality committed to increase its energy efficiency in Final energy and Community energy consumption by 10565000% by 2022 compared to 2007 levels.
    • This target will be achieved in Electricity, Transport and Heating & cooling sectors

     

    0% Energy efficiency improvement by 2020

    • The Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality committed to increase its energy efficiency in Final energy and Local Government energy consumption by 0% by 2020 compared to 2012 levels.
    • This target will be achieved in Electricity, Heating & cooling and Transport sectors

    8% Energy efficiency improvement by 2022

    • The Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality committed to increase its energy efficiency in Final energy and Local Government energy consumption by 8% by 2022 compared to levels.
    • This target will be achieved in Electricity, Transport and Heating & cooling sectors
    Adaptation and resilience target

     

    The City 's climate adaptation action plans are sector specific - the template below does not allow to reflect them seperately. However, a resilence strategy is being developed which will incorporate climate change.

    Actions
    Sustainable Energy and Climate Action Plan (SECAP)
    Climate Adaptation Plans of Action (CAPAs)
    Renewable Energy Supply - Own operations - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2008
    • Type: Technical/Infrastructure investment
    • Status: In operation

    A range of options for renewable energy supply/generation from City operations are being investigated and pursued. There is existing micro-hydro generation from bulk water supply, but it is rather old. A pre-feasibility study has been undertaken to upgrade/extend this, and these projects will commence in the next few years. A transaction advisor is being appointed to ascertain the best approach for waste to energy projects, including anaerobic digestion, a landfill gas to electricity project and methane production from waste water sludge.

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    Sectors:
    • Buildings
    • Facilities
    • Other Emissions
    local action
    Travel SMART Programme - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2011
    • Type: Education/Awareness Raising
    • Status: Completed

    Travel SMART is the City’s transport focussed travel behavioural change programme introduced as part of the City’s Travel Demand Management Strategy. Travel SMART aims to encourage and support commuters in making more informed and sustainable travel choices in order to reduce single-occupancy vehicle (SOV) use and vehicle emissions.

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    Sectors:
    • Transport
    Low Income Energy Services Programme (LINES) - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2012
    • Type: Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
    • Status: Planning phase

    The City’s Sustainable Energy Markets (SEM) department is leading this work, in collaboration with the Electricity Services, Organisational Policy and Planning and the Energy Game Changer team, and in partnership with Sustainable Energy Africa. The objective is to develop a low income household energy service delivery model that is able to provide the best possible energy services to meet household energy needs. ‘Best possible’ requires that the service is effective, clean, affordable and flexible (i.e. facilitates transition and does not lead to technology ‘lock in’). It also requires that the service delivery by the City is financially sustainable.
    The development of a Low Income Energy Services Strategy forms part of the Cape Town Sustainable Energy and Climate Action Plan (SECAP), under Objective 4: “Low income communities and households energy services”. It has been prioritised in order to devise ways to improve low income households’ access to appropriate and affordable energy services (covering solar lights, fuel efficient stoves, ceilings, solar water heaters, wonderbags, and electricity saving information, fire safety and access to electricity).The project is currently in research phases.
    The programme outputs and key areas of the LINES’s work will be:
    • Engagement with experts
    • Data collection and analysis: research towards filling key data gaps and analysis
    o Financial study
    o Household energy needs and impacts of alternative energy services study
    o Potential pilot projects
    o Modelling and Draft CCT Low Income Energy Services delivery framework/model for City adoption.

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    Sectors:
    • Commercial
    • Industrial processes and product use (IPPU)
    • Transport
    local action
    Integrated Rapid Transport System - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2010
    • Type: Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
    • Status: In operation

    To improve the way in which Capetonians move around the city, The City of Cape Town adopted an Integrated Rapid Transit (IRT) approach. The IRT system represents a package of measures that the City is applying in an attempt to provide a more sustainable, accessible and balanced transport system, encompassing Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) (known as MyCiTi) and rail. Improved public transport, along with other infrastructure developments, will encourage private car users to switch to public transport.

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    Sectors:
    • Transport
    Energy and Climate Action Plan - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2010
    • Type: Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
    • Status: Completed

    The Energy and Climate Action Plan (ECAP) was approved by full Council in 2010. The plan includes projects that are currently in existence as well as those proposed and in the pipeline. Projects span across various departments and directorates which promotes collaboration and interdepartmental integration. The ECAP, comprising 40 programme areas and more than 120 projects, operationalizes the City’s commitments, demonstrate its leadership role, and forms the basis to prioritise, budget for, implement, monitor and evaluate the City’s energy and climate change projects and programmes. The Plans objectives are incorporated in service delivery implementation plans, directorate score cards, corporate dashboards and the City’s risk register. The Energy and Climate Change Unit has also set up a system to monitor and evaluate project and programme progress. The City will continue with the implementation and coordination of the Plan, with a full review and update of the objectives and projects scheduled for the end of 2014. The objectives include: 10% reduction in city-wide electricity consumption; 10% reduction in energy consumption of Council operations and facilitating 10% renewable and cleaner energy supply by 2020.

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    Sectors:
    • Residential
    • Commercial
    • Industrial
    • Transport
    • Other Emissions
    Small Scale Embedded Generation Programme - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2012
    • Type: Technical/Infrastructure investment
    • Status: Completed

    The City of Cape Town laid the foundation for the growth of small-scale embedded generation in the city by implementing a policy and instituting SSEG tariffs The SSEG programme aims to remove barriers to the rooftop PV market through sector development and make to PV more attractive to residential and commercial consumers. Businesses and households are taking up this opportunity.The City’s program has become the de facto standard for other municipalities in South Africa who wish to allow grid connection of small scale renewable electricity generation.
    The City is also supporting improvements in the PV industry through active engagement including through the development of ‘safe and legal’ standards for installation to guide end-users. The City has also approached Green Cape and South African Photovoltaic Industry Association (SAPVIA) to assist the City with a qualification for a PV installer to make the installations in the City area save and legal. SAPVIA committed to a “Green Card” which will be a certification of a PV installation with a check list to check that the installer installed the system in a save and legal manner.

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    Sectors:
    • Commercial
    Municipal Operations - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2011
    • Type: Technical/Infrastructure investment
    • Status: In operation

    The City of Cape Town is a major energy user in its own right and is committed to improving the management of energy use in all municipal operations, to improve resource efficiency, reduce its carbon footprint and save money.
    The City has been implementing energy efficiency retrofit programmes within municipal operations since 2009, covering traffic lights, street lights, buildings and wastewater treatment plant retrofits. Rooftop solar photovoltaic systems are also installed where possible. The programme includes energy management training for facilities staff, behaviour change programmes for building users and smart driver training for the City’s fleet drivers. An extensive data management system has been developed which aligns location, metering and billing data from smart meters and administrative systems – the overall data feeds through to managers, and the specific data to staff on the ground to improve building management. All of these activities fall under the Internal Resource Management Protocol which sets out a comprehensive plan for improved resource management across all departments. Savings and progress are reported annually to the City’s Finance Department.
    All contracting is based on performance guaranteed tendering – this is an innovative approach developed by the City of Cape Town to fit with the requirements of the South African Municipal Finance Management Act and with the type of funding which can be accessed by municipalities – this approach is now being used by other municipalities in South Africa. The programme is funded by national government grants and by the City’s budget. Independent monitoring and evaluation is conducted on all projects.
    From 2009 to 2016 the programme saved over 102 000 MWh, which translates into savings of R 180 million ($ 12.6million) and 101 000 metric tonnes CO2e.
    Some examples include:
    • All traffic lights and more than 17% of street lights in Cape Town have been retrofitted with LEDs.
    • 57% of the City’s buildings have been retrofitted, including 40 large administrative buildings. Energy efficiency improvements not only reduce costs, but also improve the quality of the working environment.
    • Smart electricity meters have been installed which has greatly improved the City’s electricity use management. Linked to this project is Fundamental Energy Management training which incorporates technical and practical training to City staff on how to extract, read and interpret the smart meter data. This develops the capacity of facility managers and enables City employees to be more responsible for their use of electricity.
    • To date a total of 247 kWp rooftop photovoltaic systems has been installed on of City buildings, with investigations now being done on the potential for larger scale ground mounted systems.
    The City of Cape Town needs to ‘lead by example’ as well as ‘learn by doing’ in driving the journey towards the Cape Town Energy2040 Goal and associated targets. Through an extensive communication programme and networking platforms, these initiatives are used to promote and inspire energy efficiency and renewable energy actions across all sectors in Cape Town.

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    Sectors:
    • Commercial
    • Transport
    Low Income Housing Energy Efficiency - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2010
    • Type: Technical/Infrastructure investment
    • Status: Completed

    The City of Cape Town has implemented a number of pilot projects, together with global and national partners, towards increasing energy efficiency in low income housing. These include:
    The Kuyasa Project was a pilot project that involved the installation of solar water heaters, insulated ceilings and efficient lighting in 2300 households. It became Africa's first registered Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project and was awarded the Gold Standard. This project aimed to improve thermal efficiency of houses, decrease emissions, and lower monthly fuel bills to create a better living environment, improve indoor air quality and therefore minimising health problems. It became Africa's first registered Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project and was awarded the Gold Standard. The project was also awarded joint third place in Point Carbon's Best CDM Project 2004 Competition at the Carbon Market Insights Conference in Amsterdam. It also received a Platinum Impumelelo Award in 2010.
    The aim of the Mamre Ceilings Pilot Project was to improve the thermal efficiency of houses, decreasing energy consumption and emissions, therefore lowering monthly electricity bills to create a better living environment and improving indoor air quality. The pilot project created local employment to people who learned new skills by assisting in the installation of ceilings in their homes. The Mamre Ceilings Project was driven by the City's Environmental Resource Management Department as part of the Danish Development Aid funded Urban Environmental Management Programme. 230 houses benefitted from this pilot project. The new ceilings helped residents cut down on heating and cooling costs and improved their quality of life. An insulated ceiling is the single most important energy related upgrade that can improve the quality of life of many people, reduce their energy costs and combat health problems caused by damp and mould as a result of poor insulation. The project is now complete and created jobs for 18 unemployed people. The project benefitted the vulnerable groups within the community such as the elderly, unemployed, chronically ill, disabled people with dependants, child-headed households and single parent households. The City is currently researching the impact of the ceilings retrofit project in order to present a business case for ceilings retrofits in RDP (Reconstruction Development Programme) houses still lacking ceilings. The research is still on-going.
    The City, through the Housing Department has also implemented a pilot project to upgrade approximately 7 775 of its 45 000 council owned rental housing units in 8 identified areas. The Community Residential Unit (CRU) Programme is a national funded programme. Upgrades include the installation of ceilings and other energy efficiency measures.

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    Sectors:
    • Residential
    local action
    Sea Level Rise Risk Assessment - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2008
    • Type: Assessment/Research
    • Status: Completed

    This research project involved a risk assessment to formulate a range of sea level rise scenarios the City may face. Sea level rise will have a huge impact on a coastal city like Cape Town, as scientists predict an 85% chance of a 4,5 metre storm surge sea level rise in the next 25 years. In response, the City is implementing coastal management plans as well as development guidelines and restrictions.

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    Sectors:
    • Other Emissions
    Solar Water Heater Marketing and Accreditation Programme - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2009
    • Type: Education/Awareness Raising
    • Status: In operation

    A dedicated Solar Water Heater Accreditation Programme has been established by the City which accredits a set of quality service providers and products, and inspects installations in order to improve households’ trust. The programme also involves promoting solar water heater uptake through training, communication and educational campaigns, monitoring the performance of the selected service providers and undertaking quality control. An aerial count in in 2015 indicated there were more than 46,000 solar water heaters on roofs across Cape Town. These mean savings of R 274m in household pockets per a year, an investment of R 968m in the local economy, 1 319 job years, 128 GWhs per a year energy saved and 132 thousand tonnes of carbon emissions saved per a year.

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    Sectors:
    • Residential
    • Commercial
    City of Cape Town Climate Change Policy - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year:
    • Type: Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
    • Status: In operation

    To provide a clear policy for all decision-makers in the City of Cape Town in terms of climate change response. . The policy aims to consolidate an integrated approach to climate change through a principle-based focus on climate change adaptation and mitigation. It further provides an updated framework for addressing and responding to climate change in Cape Town. The Climate Change Policy supports integrated and comprehensive action plans to address climate change adaptation and mitigation.

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    Sectors:
    • Residential
    • Waste
    • Agriculture, Forest and Other Land Use (AFOLU)
    • Commercial
    • Industrial
    • Industrial processes and product use (IPPU)
    • Transport
    Integrated Development Plan and CDS - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2012
    • Type: Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
    • Status: In operation

    The City has deeply integrated climate change and energy issues into its high level policy and planning documents, particularly the City's Integrated Development Plan and City Development Strategy.

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    Sectors:
    • Residential
    • Commercial
    • Industrial
    • Transport
    • Other Emissions
    Smart Living and Working Programme - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2007
    • Type: Education/Awareness Raising
    • Status: Completed

    The Smart Living Campaign, now called the Smart Living and Working Programme (SLWP), was initiated in 2007. It is a comprehensive, ongoing sustainable lifestyle campaign aimed at city residents, households looking to cut costs, maintenance staff, educators, learners, builders, developers, NGOs and CBOs, environmental groups, politicians, Council staff, communities, businesses and schools in Cape Town.

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    Sectors:
    • Residential
    • Commercial
    • Transport
    Energy and Climate Change Committee - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2008
    • Type: Organizational / Governance
    • Status: In operation

    The City of Cape Town has established a range of institutional, political and administrative structures over the past few years to facilitate implementation of its energy and climate change objectives. These currently include an Energy and Climate Change Committee (a political committee established in 2008); an Economic Cluster (administrative structure) which deals with energy and green economy matters and a range of work streams to ensure transversal coordination of projects. These institutional structures have allowed for cross-departmental coordination and integration of policy and projects, knowledge exchange between officials and the political stratum and increased engagement with energy and climate change issues across the City.

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    Sectors:
    • Buildings
    • Facilities
    • Transport
    • Other Emissions
    Procurement of Battery Powered Electric Buses - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year:
    • Type: Technical / Infrastructural
    • Status: Under construction / set up

    The procurement of eleven battery powered electric buses as a pilot to test and evaluate against coventional diesel fuelled buses. Envisaged outcomes are reduced operational costs, zero emissions, empowering, enhancing and creating new opportunities for this type of technology which is a first in Africa. The buses will be operated by a private Vehicle Operating Company (VOC) and they come with a 3 year maintenance plan. Training will be provided to the staff of the VOC to operate and maintain the vehicles.

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    Sectors:
    • Transport
    local action
    Resource Efficient Spatial and Land-use Planning - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2012
    • Type: Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
    • Status: In operation

    The City of Cape Town is undertaking a number of initiatives to improve the resource efficiency and sustainability of its urban form.
    The Spatial Development Framework (SDF) was approved by Council in 2012 and has three key strategies. The first is to plan for employment and improve access to economic opportunities. The second is to manage urban growth and create a balance between urban development and environmental protection. Lastly, to build an inclusive integrated and vibrant city. The SDF is a long term (20 year) plan to manage growth and change in Cape Town. It provides a long term vision of the desired spatial form and structures of Cape Town and aligns the City's spatial development goals, strategies and policies with relevant national and provincial spatial principles and polices. It guides the proposals contained in the more detailed District Spatial Development Plan which cover a shorter planning time frame (10 year) and the preparation of Local Spatial Plans.
    The City of Cape Town has formulated a Densification Policy (2012) which ensures a more compact and resource efficient spatial pattern and promotes transport oriented development. Furthermore 8 District Plans, including integrated spatial development and environmental frameworks, have been developed and approved by the City.

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    Sectors:
    • Residential
    • Commercial
    • Industrial
    • Other Emissions
    local action
    The Low-Carbon Central City Strategy - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2013
    • Type: Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
    • Status: Completed

    In 2013 the City of Cape Town joined a partnership-driven approach towards environmental and socio-economic urban resilience by partnering with the Cape Town Partnership and local NGO Sustainable Energy Africa (SEA) to map the carbon output and energy consumption of the central city – the urban hub responsible for generating 40% of the Cape metro’s economy.
    The “Low-Carbon Central City Strategy” project was funded by the Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA) and saw the City working collaboratively to project various future scenarios to help show the impacts of various behavioural and structural changes that people can make today.
    The outcomes of this year-long strategy development initiative include new approaches in policy and action that encourage stakeholders to work in synergy with one another to reduce overall carbon emissions in the central city. A fundamental aspect of the Low-Carbon Central City Strategy is the sharing of outcomes and information with people and organisations from the private, residential, public and government sectors. New communications initiatives produced in conjunction with this strategy will help to connect more people and organisations through knowledge and experience-sharing that will help to collectively reduce the carbon footprint of the central city area.

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    Sectors:
    • Residential
    • Commercial
    • Industrial
    • Transport
    • Other Emissions
    Energy2040 Goal and Carbon Targets - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year:
    • Type: Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
    • Status: Completed

    The City of Cape Town embarked on a process in 2015 to update its Energy Futures model (based on the recently published 2015 Cape Town State of Energy Report) and develop an Energy2040 Goal and associated energy and carbon targets for Cape Town. The Energy2040 Goal will serve as a strategic tool for decision making into the future. It is informing the review of the City’s Energy and Climate Action Plan (ECAP), which was approved by Council in 2010. The City exceeded the city-wide and municipal operations energy efficiency targets which were set in the 2010 plan.

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    Sectors:
    • Residential
    • Commercial
    • Industrial
    • Transport
    local action
    Renewable Energy Supply - Large scale - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2006
    • Type: Technical/Infrastructure investment
    • Status: In operation

    The City has a target of 10% Renewable Energy by 2020 and is embarking on a range of initiatives towards the achievement of this target.
    One of these initiatives include a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) for wind energy power generated from the Darling Wind Farm (DWF), South Africa’s first commercial wind farm situated in Darling in the Western Cape, with a capacity of generating 8 GWh electricity annually. The wind farm is a partnership between the Central Energy Fund, the Development Bank of South Africa, the Danish Government, the private Darling Independent Power Producer and the City of Cape Town. The City purchases power at a premium from the DWF, which is then sold through the financial mechanism of Green Electricity Certificates. The PPA was signed in 2006 and DWF officially began generating in May 2008.
    The City is investigating the possibility of entering into further PPAs with independent power producers where large-scale (renewable and cleaner supply) electricity generation projects could add strategic benefits to the general economy. The City is currently developing a Renewable Energy Plan to meet its renewable energy target, and to support energy business investment in Cape Town and the Western Cape.

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    Sectors:
    • Residential
    • Commercial
    • Industrial
    • Other Emissions
    Solar Photovoltaic (PV) project for MyCiTi electric bus programme - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year:
    • Type: Technical / Infrastructural
    • Status: Planning phase

    The City of Cape Town through its Transport and Urban Development Authority (TDA) is transforming its public transport system by introducing electric buses and photovoltaic power systems at bus depots and other facilities to offset the energy requirements of the buses and power the facilities. As part of the pilot phase solar PV will be installed at two MyCiTi bus depots namely: Prestwich and Atlantis in order to partially offset the electricity requirements of the electric buses. The initiative will contribute towards the reduction of the City's carbon footprint and assist in meeting its overall sustainability objectives.

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    Sectors:
    • Transport
    Ceilings Retrofit Project - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2010
    • Type: Technical/Infrastructure investment
    • Status: In operation

    Since 2010, the City has begun retrofitting State-subsidised homes that were built between 1994 and 2005 without insulated ceilings and weatherproofing (as this was not included in the RDP subsidy provided by the National Government at the time). In Cape Town alone, it is estimated that there are approximately 40 000 State-subsidised homes that do not have ceilings.
    During Phase 1, the City invested R83 million for some 4 550 ceilings that were installed in various areas. In Phase 2, which was scheduled to commence in February 2017, approximately 3 451 households will be retrofitted with ceilings at a cost of R60 million. Recently (in May 2017) the City completed installing new ceilings in a further 1 142 units in Heinz Park. The City is committed to retrofitting all 40 000 homes which were built without ceilings and weatherproofing. This large-scale retrofit project has health, social, and environmental benefits and will improve the resilience of low income households and vulnerable communities.
    Through the retrofitting of ceilings, the project will improve indoor air quality, warmth, reduce condensation and mould and as a result reduced electricity consumption. In terms of health benefits, ceilings provide increased temperatures indoors over longer periods in winter as well as a decrease in condensation and draughty winds which contribute to the affliction of respiratory diseases as well as colds and flu.
    This project reflects the City’s overall approach to climate action which is designed to realise co-benefits such as improved resource security, reduced costs, improved air quality, improved quality of life, sustainable development, long term fiscal efficiency and the protection of lives, livelihoods, the economy, ecosystems and investments

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    Sectors:
    • Industrial processes and product use (IPPU)
    local action
    Home Composting - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year:
    • Type: Technical/Infrastructure investment
    • Status: In operation

    The home compositing (HC) project aims to enable Cape Town residents to compost their organic waste, diverting it from landfills. It began in 2013 as a feasibility study by the City of Cape Town to establish whether residents would use home composting (HC) containers, and how much organic waste per household would thus be diverted from landfill. This also realises significant CO2 equivalent emission reductions, making it desirable for mitigating climate change. A sample of 616 households from four medium and low income areas in Cape Town participated for nine months, and an average of 16.9kg of organic waste per household (HC container) per month was composted. A reported total of 38.3 Tons of organic waste was composted (diverted from landfill) by the 41% who reported regularly, equating to a saving of 48.8 tCO2e. As result of this success, 15 000 HC containers were purchased for distribution to households, followed by Phase 1 roll-out from April 2016, (first come first served basis). Phase 2 roll-out is in progress with 8280 HC containers rolled out to date. The total projected composted waste is 1 609T with GHG emission savings of 2 048 tCO2e per annum.

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    Sectors:
    • Industrial processes and product use (IPPU)
    • Other Emissions
    Coastal Setback Line Methodology - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2009
    • Type: Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
    • Status: Completed

    The City of Cape Town’s coastline is one of its most important socio-economic assets, providing multiple ecosystem goods and services to both locals and tourists alike. The coastline, however, also represents a source of risk to the City where dynamic coastal processes interact with social constructs such as property and infrastructure. Coastal risk within Cape Town is being compounded by the fact that many departments and tiers of government-each with their own roles and responsibilities-interact within the coastal environment. Decisions pertaining to coastal management have generally been reactive and ad-hoc, without consideration of future climate change risks such as sea-level rise or increased storm surge events. The delineation and implementation of a coastal setback line by the City represents a proactive and risk-averse approach to coastal decision making. This spatial planning mechanism is unique to Cape Town, where the legacy of Apartheid-era spatial planning remains prevalent. As such, the City has recognised the need for a setback line that incorporates both biophysical and, perhaps most importantly, socio-economic dimensions within its design. It is important to note that coastal setback lines are not effective as a tool to manage risk retrospectively, but rather they should be used to manage and prevent inappropriate development in the coastal zone into the future.

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    Sectors:
    • Terrestrial ecosystems and ecological infrastructure
    • Land use regulations
    • Coastal zone systems
    • Human security and emergency response
    • Insurance and investment
    • Urban risks associated with housing
    Coastal Sea Defence Decision Framework - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2013
    • Type: Assessment/Research
    • Status: In operation

    The South Peninsula Transport Corridor (SPTC) is being increasingly exposed to risk from coastal processes. Climate change is expected to exacerbate the exposure to these risks with significant socio-economic implications to the City and its residents with far reaching consequences. Historically responses to address these risk concerns have been reactive and piecemeal, and confined to the coastal engineering discipline. This project has bucked the trend within the City through proactively encouraging a strategic and inclusive approach to risk posed by the coastal environment. This has primarily been achieved by firstly determining the expected risk posed to SPTC through various modelling exercises over the short, medium and long term. Secondly, the project has ensured multiple stakeholders across various disciplines and across the private/public sector divide take ownership of, and to contribute to the decision making process. The systematic incorporation of practitioner, scientific and community based knowledge through an evaluation matrix has generated an outcome sensitive to the complexities of the coastal space. The success of this project has demonstrated the powerful value of inclusive decision making in responding to coastal pressures and one which promotes social justice in coastal adaptation decision making.

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    Sectors:
    • Mobility
    • Terrestrial ecosystems and ecological infrastructure
    • Land use regulations
    • Coastal zone systems
    • Human security and emergency response
    • Insurance and investment
    local action
    Sector Based Adaptation Plans Adopted - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2011
    • Type: Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
    • Status: In operation

    The City of Cape Town’s Environmental Resource Management Department developed detailed Sector Based Adaptation Plans detailing responsibilities for all line departments. These sector based plans include:
    • Housing
    • Biodiversity
    • Health
    • Spatial Planning
    • Transport
    • Catchment, River and Stormwater Management
    • Disaster Risk Management
    • Water and Sanitation
    Responsibility for each sector based plan was approved and signed by the relevant Directors and Portfolio Committees at the end of October 2011. The sector based plans are currently undergoing their first official review, updating and revision as per the Environmental Resource Management Department’s commitment to continuous improvement of the plans.

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    Sectors:
    local action
    Mistra Urban Futures Knowledge Transfer Programme - Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality
    • Start year: 2012
    • Type: Assessment/Research
    • Status: In operation

    In February 2012 the City entered into a three year partnership with the University of Cape Town’s African Centre for Cities (ACC) as part of the Mistra Urban Futures Knowledge Transfer Project (MUF-KTP). Mistra Urban Futures (MUF) is an international centre supporting sustainable urban futures by driving the co-production of knowledge. Recognising that local expertise is required to address city level challenges, the centre operates in four cities in the world including Gothenburg, Cape Town, Kisumu, and Manchester. The MUF-KTP is Cape Town’s flagship project within the Mistra Urban Futures programme.
    As part of the MUF-KTP, four academic researchers working on policy areas that complement MUF’s focus areas, are embedded in the City of Cape Town, in relevant departments, working towards these urban sustainability objectives. The policy areas that the researchers are working on include: Green Economy; Climate Change; Space Economy; and Energy Governance. The researchers are simultaneously supporting policy development by contributing context relevant knowledge, developing strategic partnerships with stakeholders both within and outside local government, and documenting the process of policy development, making urban development policy and decision making processes more legible. The research being conducted at the City is central to PhDs being conducted by each of the researchers.
    The second major component of the Knowledge Transfer Project is the City Officials exchange programme. This component provides the opportunity for high performing City staff to be provided with structured academic engagement to build their capacity, engage with international peers and profile the City’s work in internationally recognized journals. As of 2014, 14 City officials have taken part in the programme; five papers have been published or are in press, and the remainder are nearing completion.
    A key outcome of the programme will include a publication examining urban sustainability and climate change in the global south, with Cape Town as a case study. This publication will based on a model of co-production between City of Cape Town officials and academics from the University of Cape Town, and will form the final phase of the City Officials exchange programme.

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