City & County of San Francisco
United States

Population: 852469
Area of jurisdiction: 600.6 km2

Commitments

  Community Government
Absolute base year GHG reduction target: 25% by 2017 (1990) 25% by 2017 (2005)
Baseline scenario (BAU) GHG reduction target: n/a n/a
Fixed-level GHG reduction target: n/a n/a
Carbon intensity reduction target: n/a n/a
Renewable energy target: n/a 100% by 2020
Energy efficiency target: n/a n/a
Government and Community: CO2(e) targets

Performance

Community GHG Emissions
Total ( n/a ):  0 tCO2e
Government GHG Emissions
Total ( 2010 ):  211,553 tCO2e

Other available GHG inventories: 2010

Mitigation actions

School Education
There are now approximately 166 schools (including San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) Child Development Centers and private pre-schools) in San Francisco that compost with the Food to Flowers! program. Since the start of the grant in July 2011, SF Environment has started new lunchroom composting programs and recycling programs at 9 schools, improved existing programs through assemblies, student trainings, lunchroom check-ins, and/or waste assessments at 85 schools, and has educated 783 teachers and 13,428 students about how composting and recycling help schools significantly reduce their Altamont Landfillbound waste, conserve resources, and create healthy topsoil. Start year 2005
Sector Waste
Type Education/Awareness Raising
Status In progress
File  
Banned Purchase of bottled water
  Start year 2007
Sector Waste
Type Regulatory
Status Completed
File download
Business Council on Climate Change
The Business Council on Climate Change (BC3) is a public-private partnership between local government and the business community that works to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in San Francisco through collaboration and direct action. We provide a platform for business-to-government collaboration on projects that help San Francisco meet its climate goals, such as increasing electric vehicle adoption, providing private sector feedback on proposed actions under the climate action plan, and facilitating the creation of a green tenant toolkit to enhance landlord-tenant engagement on sustainability. We serve the San Francisco Bay Area business community, the City and County of San Francisco, and beyond (reducing emissions locally provides global benefits). In June of 2005, the City and County of San Francisco hosted United Nations World Environment Day (WED). At this event, Mayor Gavin Newsom signed on to the UN Global Compact Cities Pilot Program. The program's fundamental aim is to improve the quality of urban life through the effective use of local cross-sector partnerships between business, government and civil society. San Francisco is one of 14 cities participating globally. For its participation in the program, San Francisco chose to address greenhouse gas emissions in the commercial and residential sectors. Recognizing the need for a regional approach, The Bay Area Council (BAC), the San Francisco Department of the Environment (SF Environment), and the UN Global Compact embarked on a new initiative to foster efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the Bay Area's commercial sector. The Business Council on Climate Change (BC3) was conceived through this partnership to take a position of leadership on the issue of climate change by inspiring Bay Area business leaders to sign on to the BC3 Principles on Climate Change Leadership. The BC3 program seeks to give businesses the tools to reduce their own greenhouse gas emissions and to take a lead role in helping their communities and employees do the same. Start year 2007
Sector Other Emissions
Type Education/Awareness Raising
Status Looking for Funding
File  
Existing Commercial Building Benchmarking Ordinance
  Start year 2012
Sector Buildings
Type Regulatory
Status Completed
File download
Municipal Green Building LEED Ordinance
  Start year 2006
Sector Buildings
Type Regulatory
Status Completed
File download
Commercial Green Building LEED Ordinance
  Start year 2007
Sector Buildings
Type Regulatory
Status In progress
File download
Green Purchasing
CCSF has banned the purchase of several environmentally harmful products for City Government including plastic water bottles, sytrofoam, and plastic bags. This year CCSF banned the unsolicited distribution of Yellow Pages to San Francisco residents. "The over-distribution of telephone directories results in an unconscionable waste of natural resources, and costs the city over one million dollars every year to process through the San Francisco refuse system The City receives almost 1.6 million Yellow Pages phone books each year, although there are about 800,000 residents. If stacked the books equal the height of more than 287 TransAmerica Pyramids – nearly eight and a half times the height of Mount Everest -- and create nearly 7 million pounds of waste annually. San Francisco residents can still have Yellow Pages delivered, they just have to ask for the company directly for the service. Start year  
Sector Other Emissions
Type Regulatory
Status In progress
File download
Clean Taxi Ordinance
The Clean Taxi ordinance was passed in 2008 and originally published as Police Code Section 1135.3. The SFMTA re-enacted the requirement as Transportation Code, Division II, Sections 1106(m) (emissions reductions) and 1114(e)(9)(A) (annual reporting requirement). As the ordinance went into effect, the SFMTA, in coordination with the Department of the Environment, encouraged companies and drivers to purchase alternative fuel vehicles by providing a Clean Air Taxi Grant incentive. Grants of $2,000 provided by the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) and the San Francisco Transportation County Authority (SFCTA) were issued to purchasers on a first come-first served basis. A total of $518,670.29 of grant funds was dispersed to help purchase 251 hybrid vehicles. The policy has been incredibly successful both from industry’s side and from an environmental perspective. Because the law did not mandate the purchase of any specific vehicle, but rather set a performance standard for each cab company’s fleet, and also offered some funds to help transition the first round of new vehicles (in the form of the Clean Air Taxi Grant), drivers and companies were able to choose the vehicles that best match their needs and met the emissions requirements overall. As of January 2012, the average taxi cab emits 30 metric tons of carbon per year compared to an average emission of 59 metric tons per year in 1990, a 49 percent reduction. The fleet is 92 percent hybrid or CNG vehicles. There are 1,318 alternative fuel vehicles out of a total of 1,432 eligible vehicles. The CNG vehicles account for 89 of those and the hybrids account for 1,229. San Francisco currently has 1,521 taxis in service. Of these, 89 are ramp taxi vehicles that are not subject to clean air vehicle requirements due to the lack of good alternative fuel wheelchair accessible vans available on the market. Start year 2009
Sector Transport
Type Regulatory
Status Completed
File download
Zero Waste Goal
San Francisco is pursuing a goal of zero waste to lanfill by 2020, with the primary stategy of maximum source separation of recyclables and compostables for highest and best use. San Francisco’s leads the nation with a 78% diversion from landfill, documented for 2009. This represents an annual reduction of disposal to landfill from over 850,000 tons in 2000 to under 450,000 tons in 2010, due primarily to the increasing amount of material being recycled and composted that has increased to 1.6 million tons per year, a near doubling from 2000 to 2010. To help move toward the cities zero waste goal, in 2009 the Board of Supervisors passed the Mandatory Recycling and Composting Ordinance. This required organic collection be provided to all residences, apartment buildings, commercial businesses, city facilities and public events. This has had a noticeable impact in increasing diversion, for example the amount of comopstables collected for composting increased from 400 Tons Per Day(TPD) prior to 600 TPD in 2 years since the passage of the mandatory ordinance. Start year 2005
Sector Waste
Type Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
Status In progress
File download
Clean Technology Payroll Tax Exclusion
The City of San Francisco provides a payroll expense tax exclusion for up to 10 years to clean technology companies located in the City. THe tax credit is exclusion from the requirement to pay local payroll taxes until 2020. Start year  
Sector  
Type Fiscal/Financial mechanism
Status In progress
File download
Meatless Monday City
San Francisco is known for touting innovative cuisine and healthy lifestyles. On April 6th 2010 city by the bay raised the bar in both arenas by becoming the first Meatless Monday city! The resolution passed by San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors ensures that residents will gain greater access to healthy, meatless options while learning about the connection between what they eat, their health and sustainability. San Francisco is also working with Green Cities California to promote climate friendly food choices and, since the late 1990's has sponsored and promoted farmers markets in neighborhoods with poor access to fresh produce. Emissions from the consumption of food and beverages by San Franciscans were estimated using an EIO-LCA to be 4,530,000 MTCO2 in 2008. Switching to an alternative from red meat (one of the most carbon intensive foods) one day a week would result in a significant emissions reduction. Start year 2010
Sector Other Emissions
Type Education/Awareness Raising
Status In progress
File  
Solar Map
In partnership with CH2M Hill, the City developed the San Francisco Solar Map, an educational online tool that allows users to find the solar potential for every rooftop in the City and provides information about local solar resources, incentives, news, and other helpful information. The City added a solar water heating calculator in 2011 and a wind energy layer in 2012. This online resource has been a significant education and outreach tool for our community. Start year 2009
Sector  
Type Education/Awareness Raising
Status Completed
File  
GoSolarSF
In order to address the upfront cost barriers and stimulate local solar market development, the City implemented the GoSolarSF program in 2007. One of few local solar incentive programs in the country, GoSolarSF encourages more installations of solar power in San Francisco with annual appropriations of $5M. The program provides incentives to residential, business, and non-profit organizations as well as additional funding for low-income and environmental justice installations. As of February 2012, the program has facilitated 1,680 new solar systems (5.4 MW), created 81 green collar jobs through the City’s workforce development program, and paid $17.2M worth of incentives. Start year 2007
Sector  
Type Technical/Infrastructure investment
Status In progress
File  
Boiler Program
The new ARRA funded Boiler Program expects to reduce natural gas usage by approximately 399,000 Therms during the program cycle by incentivizing a variety of heating system measures such as heating boilers, hot water heaters, steam traps, air vents, pipe insulation, radiators, thermostats, premium efficiency pump motors, and variable frequency drives. To date 218 retrofits have been completed. The program is not currently funded beyond 2012. Start year 2010
Sector Buildings
Type Education/Awareness Raising
Status Completed
File download
Home Energy Improvement Program
San Francisco Home Energy Improvement Program (SFHIP) and SF Green Home Assessment fund energy efficiency assessments and retrofits in single family homes and multifamily dwelling units. Start year 2011
Sector Buildings
Type Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
Status In progress
File  
GreenFinanceSF
GreenFinanceSF, San Francisco’s Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing program, can provide accessible, 100% financing at attractive rates and terms for the installation of energy efficiency, renewable energy, and water conservation improvements in qualifying commercial buildings. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors has authorized $100M in funding capacity for the current commercial program. Start year 2012
Sector Buildings
Type Fiscal/Financial mechanism
Status In progress
File  
Energy Watch Program
The SF Energy Watch program is a joint operation paid for by PG&E and implemented by San Francisco Department of Environment. that helps businesses and multifamily buildings lower their energy bills by offering: free site assessments, rebates for new energy-efficient equipment, and installation services. Current efficiency actions are not in themselves expected to yield any net reductions. However, they are expected to significantly reduce growth in projected demand. Overall electricity demand is expected to increase ~0.8%/yr based on a recent 2009 California Energy Demand forecast report from the California Energy Commission (CEC). This is driven primarily by population growth (~0.8%/yr) and increasing market penetration of electric vehicles. The SF Energy Watch program and the retrofitting piece of the Existing Commercial Building Benchmarking program and other energy efficiency are projected to help reduce annual usage 0.5 GWh by 2050. Start year  
Sector Buildings
Type Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
Status In progress
File  
Transit Oriented Development
By concentrating new development along existing transit corridors, San Francisco has decreased GHG emissions and growth in vehicle miles traveled. In California, surveys show that residents who live near a transit station take transit to work at a rate five times higher than residents who do not live near stations. Transit improvements should be prioritized and financed though development agreements where new, high-density mixed-use projects are located. Proper analysis of multimodal trips generated by development projects will help determine fairshare contributions toward transit operations and capital, complete streets and travel demand management options for these new and redeveloped sites. San Francisco has already begun components of this innovative TOD strategy. Recent project approvals have included the provision of transit passes in new development, lower parking requirements and higher carsharing provisions. Progressive development agreements create GHG reductions, greater livability and allow employees and residents to practice sustainable mobility. Start year  
Sector Other Emissions
Type Technical/Infrastructure investment
Status In progress
File  
Transit Schedule Improvements
Transit improvements are critical to the success of the CAS so that adequate capacity exists to accommodate mode shifts and growing ridership. Muni is already operating beyond capacity during peak commuter times and demand is expected to increase significantly by 2035 for the SFMTA and the Bay Area’s transit operators. Optimizing and expanding the existing system to create new capacity improvements in the urban core, combine with the TDM and pricing strategies to create a more sustainable transportation system overall. Start year  
Sector Transport
Type Technical/Infrastructure investment
Status In progress
File  
Complete Streets Policy
In the 20th Century U.S. transportation engineers primarily designed roadways to allow cars to move quickly and easily. Today, redesigning streets to address the needs of all users is widely accepted. Designing streets that accommodate people’s needs, as San Francisco is doing with efforts like the Better Streets Plan, Walk First, the Bicycle Plan and the Transit Effectiveness Project (TEP), creates pleasant urban environments for all users: people in stores, on sidewalks, bicycles, transit and in cars. In lieu of the past focus on wide thoroughfares with abundant parking, the Complete Streets Strategy creates the city’s multimodal connective network. Dedicated transit lanes, cycle tracks, and landscaping facilitate the sustainable mode split goal Landscaping sidewalks and medians also develops the urban forest, a recognized carbon sink for the city. Start year 2011
Sector Transport
Type Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
Status In progress
File download
Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
In 2012, nearly 100 EV chargers for public use will be installed at more than 20 city owned locations, including the Airport, Treasure Island, the Zoo, and city owned parking garages throughout San Francisco. In addition, private land owners have installed chargers for public use at 20 or more locations in the city. A network of approximately 50 high voltage fast-charge stations has received grant funding and will be installed in San Francisco and the Bay Area in the next several years to assist longer-range driving. For homeowners, permits for installing chargers can be obtained in one day for most single-family buildings, and Department of Environment is managing a statefunded demonstration program to install approximately 100 chargers in San Francisco multifamily buildings. Start year 2012
Sector Transport
Type Technical/Infrastructure investment
Status Completed
File  
CleanPower SF
The single biggest emission reduction in our set of climate actions will come from the implementation of the San Francisco Mayors 100% Renewable Electricity Goal which aims to have the City producing and sourcing 100% of its electricity from clean resources in the next two decades. Currently all municipal government operations including Muni and all City buildings run on clean hydroelectric power from Hetch Hetchy Resevoir. The impact of moving the whole community to carbon free electricity is an anticipated reduction of 800,000-1,500,000 MTCO2. CCSF has made significant progress in reducing its carbon footprint particularly because of the work it has done with community, corporate and state partners to clean up its local power generation. Going forward there are two mechanisms being considered to deliver 100% clean power. They are : 1) CleanPower SF, a program under Community Choice Aggregation where the SFPUC would provide at a competitive price to PG&E clean power option to public customers or 2) A green power program from PG&E where public customers could chose to pay for greener electricity. Start year 2014
Sector  
Type Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
Status In progress
File download
Commuter Benefits Ordinance
The Department of Environment implements the City’s landmark Commuter Benefits Ordinance requiring businesses with 20 or more employees to offer their employees a commuter benefit for transit and vanpooling as allowed by federal tax law, and also administers the City’s pre-tax commuter benefits program for city employees. One type of commuter program that employers can offer employees, and which the City offers its employees, is the ability to use pre-tax money to pay for transit and vanpool expenses. Employees can save up to 40% on commuting expenses by using pre-tax money. This is a significant inducement for people to change their habits away from commuting in singleoccupancy cars. The Commuter Benefits Ordinance has been in effect since 2009 but the Department of Environment has been was promoting the commuter benefits program to employers even before then. The pre-tax commuter benefits program has been available to city employees since 1999. In the first three years of implementation, the number of employers who have submitted compliance forms for the San Francisco Commuter Benefits Ordinance has increased by approximately 1,000 per year, with 3,659 employers submitting compliance forms in 2011. In addition, 4,744 City employees participated in the City’s pre-tax commuter benefits program in 2011. Start year 2009
Sector Transport
Type Regulatory
Status In progress
File  
PC Air Emission Offsets
The significant increase in the PC Air emission offsets from FY 2009 to FY 2010 is due to the installation of dedicated PC Air units at 11 jet bridges in Boarding Areas Cand F and activation of these units in FY 2010. SFO has also installed 14 PC Air units at jet bridges in the renovated Terminal 2 and 10 PC Air units at Boarding Area E. Start year 2009
Sector Transport
Type Fiscal/Financial mechanism
Status Completed
File  
SFO Airport Tree Planting
The San Francisco International Airport (SFO) has the most aggressive ghg reduction plan of any airport in the US. Tree planting is just one of many measures they have taken and are taking to neutralize their operational carbon footprint. SFO has planted of 2,020 trees of different varieties around the Airport in recent years. These trees are estimated to sequester as much as 121 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year. Start year  
Sector Other Emissions
Type Technical/Infrastructure investment
Status  
File  
SFGreasecycle
Launched in 2007, SFGreasecycle is a citywide effort that diverts fats oils and greases (FOG) away from the sewers and turns it into biofuel to run San Francisco fleets. Start year 2007
Sector Waste
Type Technical/Infrastructure investment
Status In progress
File  
Methane Recovery from Waste Water Treatment
All methane produced on site at the Ocean Beach Waste Water Treatment Plan is used to generate electricity and hot water. The hot water is used to keep the digesters heated. In all, the combined energy output accounts for 33% of the treatment plant's power needs. Start year  
Sector Waste
Type Technical/Infrastructure investment
Status In progress
File  
Municipal Solar Energy Installation
SFPUC Power currently has 11 solar installations in various locations across City government. From the 5 Megawatt system at Sunset Reservoir, the largest municipal installations in California, to installations on Muni stations, libraries and the airport SFPUC has installed a total of 6,965.5 KW on public locations throughout the City. Start year  
Sector  
Type Technical/Infrastructure investment
Status Completed
File  
Biofuels in Municipal Transport
Executive Directive 06-02, Biodiesel for Municipal Fleets. The City’s Biofuels Program began with the Mayor’s Biodiesel Executive Directive issued in 2006. This directive requiring the municipal fleet to use of biodiesel blends of B20 or higher. A Citywide Biofuels Strategic Plan is currently being prepared that is intended to expand the scope of this effort to include all biofuels the City could potentially utilize, with the intent of making the City as close as possible to being self-sufficient in its use of locally sourced, renewable biofuels for all its transportation fuel, other than electric powered vehicles by 2020. Start year 2006
Sector Transport
Type Technical/Infrastructure investment
Status In progress
File download
Capital Improvements Program: Energy Efficiency
The SFPUC’s 10-year CIP is budgeted to spend $15 million on energy efficiency programs for municipal facilities. Energy efficiency is a green resource and by reducing facility energy use, City departments reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. The SFPUC is the City’s lead agency reducing municipal electricity and natural gas use and has specialized energy efficiency services available to provide energy efficiency planning, design and construction assistance to departments interested in reducing facility electricity, steam and natural gas use. SFPUC’s Energy Efficiency Services (EES) can provide City departments with a comprehensive suite of energy efficiency technical services including energy audit, design and construction management and administration. Start year  
Sector Buildings
Type Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
Status In progress
File  
DepCAPs
Every City and County of SF Department is required by Board of Supervisor Mandate to complete a Climate Action Plan every year. This process allows all sustainability information and requirements to be captured under a cohesive program and reported through a single document while also enabling the Departments to track their carbon footprints on an ongoing basis. This is an unfunded mandate. The project is lead by the Climate Team at the Department of Environment and includes program staff from Zero Waste, Green Purchasing, Clean Air, SFPUC Water and Power, Central Shops, Real Estate and Department of Technology. Start year 2008
Sector Other Emissions
Type Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
Status In progress
File  

Adaptation actions

Climate Resilient SF
SF Environment will work with non-governmental organizations to implement Climate Resilient SF, a grassroots outreach campaign on climate change and adaptation. It will work with its existing networks and build on its work on the Community Climate Action Strategy, as well as its work on the City’s urban forest, 100% renewable energy, and urban agricultural plans. While many cities have done exemplary work on both climate mitigation and adaptation planning, the plans often remain in the policy arena and may not filter into the public’s consciousness. The primary purpose of Climate Resilient SF is to build upon SFE’s success in increasing recycling and composting through face to face engagement strategies to get adaptation information into the public eye and integrated into existing social and economic systems in our target communities. Recognizing the often complex and overwhelming nature of climate change SFE’s goal is to take the adaptation strategy down into manageable actions for individuals, sectors and organizations, presenting in such a format that will inspire and successfully engage citizens to take action. SFE plans to achieve this by targeting an audience that is already determined to be at higher risk from anticipated climate impacts. SF Environment will focus on San Francisco’s two most vulnerable communities—the financial district and Bayview Hunters Point (BVHP) informing them about the vulnerabilities our city and their neighborhoods face because of climate change and strategies that can be taken to address those vulnerabilities. Between these two communities outreach strategies that target both economically environmental justice impacted communities and the high value real estate, finance and technology intuitions in our financial sector will be developed and rolled out. Ultimately the findings and the main adaptation plan will also be shared with and advertized to the San Francisco general public. All engagement strategies that come from this process will be publicized and made available to the wider sustainability community at-large. Project Description San Francisco is engaged in two parallel paths to address climate change: 1) mitigating its effects by reducing carbon emissions and 2) planning for adaptation to the environmental, social and economic challenges of climate change. As noted in the Carbonn application, San Francisco has many plans, policies and programs to support these efforts and has extensive experience working with a range of stakeholders from the residential, commercial and municipal sectors. San Francisco is developing a formal adaptation plan to prepare for the likely impacts of climate change, which will expose the city and its residents to new hazards and heightened risks. The city will be challenged by increasing temperatures, changes in precipitation patterns, rising sea levels, and more intense and frequent extreme events, including storm surges and flooding. The adaptation plan will protect residents by strengthening the city’s resilience and long-term sustainability, and ensure that the city maintains its role as one of the nation’s premier financial and technology centers. Flooding has already been identified as the biggest threat to the City, with neighborhoods in low-lying areas the most at risk. Most of the near-term damage that sea level rise is expected to inflict on developed areas is from storm conditions that occur at the same time as high tides. Thus, even while the formal plan is being developed, SF Environment will launch Climate Resilient SF, a concerted grassroots effort to engage communities on the most immediate and pressing adaptation issues, such as flooding. SF Environment is creating and coordinating an advisory panel with staff from other city departments, technical experts, the insurance industry and other business representatives, and community leaders to work on the formal adaptation plan. Many of these community leaders will also be involved in the parallel grassroots engagement campaign. This parallel process will inform the long-term adaptation plan’s ongoing community engagement components. In creating the formal plan, the advisory team will synthesize the existing city plans, the most current research on likely climate change impacts and will work with its stakeholders to determine action steps that residents, businesses, and municipal government can take to manage climate impacts. The plan will include guidelines for incorporating adaptation needs into infrastructure investments and economic planning. It will incorporate information and lessons learned from Climate Resilient SF inform continuing education and engagement of residents and businesses. The formal plan will integrate the work of city departments that have already begun planning for climate change and adaptation. • The Port of San Francisco’s study of impacts of sea level rise on its properties. • The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission reviews of potential water supply impacts of climate change, a risk assessment of the water treatment facility at Ocean Beach, and its work to incorporate sea level rise in the sewer system master plan. • The San Francisco Department of Public Health’s assessment of public health impacts, including heat wave vulnerability, funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. • San Francisco International Airport’s evaluation of potential climate change impacts. Many city departments have outlined preliminary outreach plans on their particular adaptation issues. Climate Resilient SF will incorporate those resources. For example, messaging on water bills—a function of the SF Public Utilities Commission, or targeted bus shelter and bus posters—a function of the Municipal Transit Authority. An important aspect of Climate Resilient SF is to prepare residents on the need for infrastructure development and obtain their buy-in on creating funding for these projects. For example, the SF Public Utilities Commission, which oversees the city’s water and sewage services, is preparing for a multi-million dollar infrastructure project to address stormwater and sewage overflow during episodes of extreme flooding. This development will increase resident’s water bills. Residents must understand the need for these kinds of adaptation projects, but in conjunction, they should also know about the resources the city can provide to help offset the increases, such as rebates on low-flow toilets and other water conservation technologies. Inclusion of an audience representative of the community at-large All of San Francisco’s neighborhoods and its critical infrastructures will be impacted by Climate Change to some degree and each neighborhood has specific vulnerabilities which must be addressed. Thus adaptation planning and outreach will be crafted to the concerns of different neighborhoods. One of the challenges of engaging the public around an issue as challenging as climate change, is that the information is overwhelming and people often feel like solutions are out of their control. SF Environment prides itself on its ability to break this information down into more manageable components and offer resources and solutions. However it still relies on input from community members to help create strategies that recognize the strengths and systems in the community and how those strengths can support outreach efforts. In January 2013, SF Environment will began public education on its recently completed Community Climate Action Strategy (CCAS), which was prepared with input from a range of stakeholders –businesses, non-governmental organizations, and other municipal staff. These same stakeholders will work with SF Environment to disseminate the CCAS in their communities and use it to start the conversation on adaptation. SF Environment will hold launch parties and press events about the CCAS. The document will be highly publicized in communities though out the City and will ultimately roll into Climate Resilient SF. SF Environment will issue a Request for Proposal to enlist panel members from CCAS process and others to present ideas and programs for community engagement and outreach. It will then award funding to some of these groups based on winning plans. It will work with the selected organizations to support them to engage their communities in Climate Resilient SF. Participants are informed about vulnerabilities and strategies taken to address those vulnerabilities Initially, SF Environment will focus on San Francisco’s two most vulnerable communities—the financial district and Bayview Hunters Point (BVHP). While both communities are located on the San Francisco Bay, they are very different neighborhoods and will require engagement strategies crafted to address their specific concerns. • The financial district is home to some of the largest businesses and financial institutions in the country and world. There is an unprecedented opportunity to build on the work of the City’s Business Council on Climate Change to engage corporate leaders in adaptation engagement and preparation. • Located in the Southeast area of San Francisco, BVHP is home to approximately 34,000 residents, or 4% of the City’s population. It is a racially diverse neighborhood that has been burdened with health disparities, poverty, economic blight and environmental pollution. With more than 200 brownfields and one federal superfund site—the health issues related to flooding in BVHP are immense. As seen in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, floodwaters could release buried toxins into surface and groundwater. BVHP is also home to the City’s waste water treatment facility, which will be tremendously impacted by flooding. However, BVHP is also a community of enormous diversity, creativity and potential and these strengths are an asset for engagement. Engagement strategy are publicized and made available to the wider community at-large. SF Environment will make all information and materials available on its own website and stakeholders websites. It will distribute information widely about community meetings and forums. The process for creating the formal plan and then parallel process of engaging the community will be highly replicable and lessons learned and materials will be disseminated to other cities. In addition to its dissemination to local stakeholders and community members, SF Environment will make information available to a broader audience that might be interested in the success of the project. San Francisco is part of several statewide, national, and international collaborations including Green Cities California, the Urban Sustainability Directors Network and the C-40. It will present on the project to these organizations and other groups such as the Environmental Protection Agency. Previous efforts in public engagement related to climate, energy, and/or sustainability programming SF Environment helps meet the City’s ambitious environmental goals through the interconnected strategies of partnership, policy and promotion. It is already engaged in partnerships and outreach activities to encourage residents, businesses and other municipal departments to make behavior changes that will reduce their carbon emissions. It will use these existing partnerships to move into the area of working with communities on adaptation planning. A sample of its successful planning and engagement projects include; the plan to achieve 100% renewable energy by 2020, the 2002 and 2011 Electricity Resource Plans, the 2004 Climate Action Plan and 2011 Community Climate Action Strategy (CCAS). During the spring of 2011, SF Environment convened five community advisory panels to provide feedback and help shape the update to the CCAS. Each of the panels addressed key sectors, challenges and opportunities presented by the CCAS; as well as the connection between climate policy, green jobs and underserved communities. SF Environment will call on many of these panel members to participate as it moves into preparing the community for climate adaptation. CCAS panels were: Gray to Green, Urban Greening and Climate Change was chaired by the SF Rec and Parks Department and included community and neighborhood organizations to look at the role trees, gardens and green spaces play in supporting climate action goals and community resiliency and offer ideas for supporting stakeholder activities. The panel included Friends of the Urban Forest, Green Schoolyard Alliance, Quesada Gardens, ICLEI, Nature in the City, SF Planning and Urban Research, SF Parks Trust, and SF Urban Ag Alliance. New Century Transportation, Moving the Future Forward focused on shifting modes of transportation from single occupant vehicles to shuttles, car shares, walking, biking and public transit. Members provided comment to the SF Municipal Transportation Agency's (SFMTA) Community Transportation Climate Action Strategy and included the SF Bike Coalition, the Coalition for SF Neighborhoods, CityCarShare, Caltrans, Bauer Transportation, Plug-in America, WalkSF, Pacific Gas & Electric, StreetLight Data, the SFMTA, and SF County Transportation Authority. Energy Independence, Global Technologies and Local Solutions looked at the energy sector and energy independence and focused on the role of natural gas in our buildings carbon footprint as renewable electricity options were simultaneously being addressed by the Mayors 100% Renewable Energy Task Force. Members included the Building Owners and Managers Association Luminalt Solar, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Kevles Consulting, and SunWater Solar. Business Case While negative pressure from some big businesses has been an issue for climate policy at the Federal level, several innovative members of the local business community endorse the City’s aggressive emission reduction goals and participated in this panel. Chaired by the Business Council on Climate Change, it included Arup, Bentley Prince Street, Blue Shield of California, Cole Hardware, Gap inc., Google, Hilton, New Resource Bank, PG&E, Safeway, True Market Solutions, Wells Fargo, and Yahoo. Economic Prosperity, Jobs, & Environmental Justice Historically environmental policy has been presented as being in conflict with economic development. Yet many communities that are most in need of economic development are also negatively impacted by poor environmental conditions. This panel looked at the potential impacts local climate policy could have on economic development and how to link green policies with local job creation while keeping environmental justice values. It included the Center on Race, Poverty & the Environment, the Goodwill, the Mayor's Office of Economic and Workforce Development, People Organizing to Demand Environmental & Economic Rights, Interfaith Power & Light, Asian Neighborhood Design, the Environmental Law & Justice Clinic at Golden Gate School of Law, Global Exchange, and the YMCA. SF Environment has implemented many successful outreach activities and engagement campaigns across most environmental issues, including: • SF Environment has used targeted outreach and education to increase solar deployment. It worked to educate neighborhood groups on the benefits of solar and supported group solar purchases, leading to 134 installations with a combined capacity of more than 300 kW. On the commercial side, SFE provided outreach to the 1500 largest rooftops in the city, providing free site assessments and solar analysis for these high-potential properties. SF Environment partnered with World Resources Institute to develope Solar@Work to address barriers of upfront costs and financing availability. It brought property owners and other local businesses together to receive significant discounts on solar electric system installation costs, as well as innovative, integrating financing options, including solar leases and power purchase agreements. • SF Environment has a robust Zero Waste outreach and education program, which has resulted in 80% diversion of its waste going to landfill. It provides outreach materials and support that targets the residential, commercial and municipal sectors. In early 2012, it implemented a Zero Waste campaign targeting one specific neighborhood with advertising, community events, poster contests and social media. This model for geographically specific outreach was very successful, leading to an increase in diversion. • San Francisco is dramatically improving the efficiency of its buildings—both new and existing. This has required extensive outreach to businesses and residents on its energy efficiency programs for small businesses, multi-unit buildings and individual residents. SF Environment also passed the Commercial Building Energy Benchmarking Ordinance for buildings of over 10,000 ft2 and as a result of its extensive outreach and technical support has achieved a 65% compliance rate. • SF Environment will be involved in promoting CleanPowerSF. this community choice aggregation program allows residents to opt-out of purchasing energy from the local utility provider and instead purchase 100% renewable electricity through the City. • The Energy Efficiency team has been operating the Home Improvement Program for three years. This comprehensive program for San Francisco residents provides free home assessments covering from earthquake preparedness to eliminating toxics in the home to reducing energy consumption through weatherizing and retro-fits. Once assessments are complete, the program connects people to resources to implement the recommendations. This program is leading to neighborhood wide resiliency. • For more than ten years SF Environment has been working in neighborhoods that suffer from a range of environmental justice issues. It has administered a grant program created from mitigation funds resulting from a class action lawsuit. Grants have been made to community groups working on Environmental Justice issues such as air quality, food security, diesel emission reductions, green jobs, and providing energy efficiency retrofits and solar installations. It has led grassroots outreach campaigns to reduce asthma rates by providing alternatives to toxin-laden cleaning and pest management supplies. • SF Environment has partnered with the San Francisco Public Library on Greenstacks, a comprehensive project that encompasses renovating branches to LEED standards, greening operations and maintenance; providing green collections of books, videos and DVD’s; and creating programming and events that support the City’s environmental goals. This awarding winning program works with all 27 branch libraries and has the potential to reach the more than 400,000 San Franciscans who hold library cards. • In preparing the City for the upcoming plastic bag ban SF Environment worked with Greenstacks to screen the film “Bag It” at branches around the City. Attendees participated in post-screening Question and Answer sessions on the upcoming Bag Ban. SF Environment also held more than 60 events in each district and gave out 20,000 canvass bags. There were numerous editorials and articles in local and national newspapers, which supported the grassroots campaign. One of the most important components to SF Environment’s work is its capacity to provide face-to-face outreach and its commitment to grassroots organizing. SF Environment has a robust team of 2000 volunteers that mirror the City’s multi-cultural and multi-lingual population. In July 2009, SF Environment created Environment Now, an outreach and green jobs training program that provides ecoliteracy, and education on pressing environmental issues. Participants stay in the program for two years and at any given time there are 20 participants. After completing basic environmental training Environment Now participants become outreach workers and community educators. Most are from neighborhoods vulnerable to the effects of climate change and they serve as SF Environment ambassadors to those communities. For more than 20 years, SF Environment has partnered with and provided support to more than 30 community based organizations working on Zero Waste programs, such as the SF Conservation Corps, Goodwill, Clean City, Community Housing Partnership, Asian Neighborhood Design, Charity Cultural Services and many others. SF Environment will access these relationships as it moves forward in preparing residents for climate change. For a detailed work plan and budget please see the attached document. Start year 2013
Sector  
Type Public Participation/Stakeholder engagement
Status Looking for Funding
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SF Carbon Fund
In 2007 the Mayor of San Francisco launched the SFCarbon Fund. The program was piloted with the aiport and its first project was a waste based biofuel fueling station in the south eastern part of the city. After several years the pilot at SFO was discontinued for lack of participation and it was determined that small scale project development for verified emissions reductions (VERs) by the City was not feasible/appropriate. The San Francisco Carbon Fund is now in transition and is under consideration to be made into a urban green fund to increase the planting and care of urban forest and green spaces. While carbon reductions from trees are comparatively small, the complete package of ecosystem services including carbon sequestration and storage, storm water mitigation, and heat resistance make the urban forest a key part of the City's Climate Action Strategy. Start year 2007
Sector Food Security
Type Fiscal/Financial mechanism
Status Looking for Funding
File  
Local Water Supply Program
Diversifying local water sources with recycled water is a critical part of San Francisco's long term water supply plan. The Westside Recycled Water Project is part of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission’s Local Water Supply Program, which is working to produce a reliable and sustainable local water supply through a combination of additional groundwater usage, more conservation, and increased water reuse. The project would include a new recycled water treatment plant that would provide 2 million gallons per day of advanced level treated water for non-potable purposes (e.g. non-drinking uses such as irrigation and toilet flushing) to a variety of customers on the west side of San Francisco. These customers include Golden Gate Park, Lincoln Park and the Lincoln Park Golf Course, the Presidio Golf Course and the California Academy of Sciences. Start year 2012
Sector Water Resources
Type Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
Status In progress
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Urban Agriculture
The Department of Environment, the Recreation and Parks Department, the Department of Public Health and the Public Libraries have all worked closely with community organizations to create new urban farms. From Alemany farm in south San Francisco to Hayes Valley farm on the site of an old freeway exit ramp in a now thriving Civic Center neighborhood, to small gardens on Park lands and Library grounds the public farms are flourishing! On the private side in 2011 the San Francisco Board of Supervisors made a change to planning and zoning codes allowing commercial sale of neighborhood scale and large scale urban agriculture products. Start year  
Sector Food Security
Type Technical/Infrastructure investment
Status In progress
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Healthy and Sustainable Foods mandate
Executive Directive 09-03 on Healthy and Sustainable Food mandates that "All departments having jurisdiction over property will conduct an audit of their land suitable for or actively used for food producing gardens or other agricultural purposes and prepare a report with the findings to my office and a copy to the Office of Food Systems within 180 days of signing this directive”. Start year  
Sector Food Security
Type Assessment/Research
Status In progress
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