City of Lake Macquarie Council

Australia Mayor: Jodie Harrison
Summary
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    Population 189006
  • km 2
    Area 648.0
  • N/A
    GDP N/A
  • emission
    Targets by N/A N/A
Actions
Council Vehicle Fleet Fuel Savings - City of Lake Macquarie Council
  • Start year: 2011
  • Type: Technical/Infrastructure investment
  • Status: Completed

An overall decrease in fuel burn equated to a 210 metric ton
decrease in carbon emissions. Initiatives included: continued
use of an in-line diesel fuel filtration system (to improve fuel
quality and minimize consumption); fleet evaluation resulting
in the implementation of a 100% four-cylinder light
commercial fleet, a passenger fleet with four-cylinder vehicles
accounting for 81% and hybrid vehicles representing
10%; the trial of an electric vehicle and installation of
the Hunter region’s first public electric vehicle charge point
at Council’s Customer Service Center; and the replacement
of 24 trucks (20% of the truck fleet) with the new Euro V
compliant engines

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Sectors:
  • Transport
local action
Solar Photovoltaic Installations - City of Lake Macquarie Council
  • Start year: 2010
  • Type: Technical/Infrastructure investment
  • Status: Completed

15,538,500 (private investment)
In 2008, Council established targets to reduce Council’s
greenhouse gas emissions by 3% per annum (p.a.) and to
facilitate a reduction of city-wide greenhouse gas emissions
by 3% per capita p.a. During the 12-month period, Council
installed 39.52 kilowatts of solar photovoltaic across three
sites, including the Council’s Works Depot, Charlestown Library,
and the Headquarters of the State Emergency Service.
The solar photovoltaic installations have made Council more
resilient to rising energy prices, and saves Council $12,750.00
p.a. while also reducing its carbon footprint by 62 metric
tons (t) of equivalent carbon dioxide emissions (CO2 e)/p.a. In
March 2011-March 2012, the Lake Macquarie local government
area recorded residential solar photovoltaic capacity at
4.4 megawatts, an estimated savings of US$ 1.2 million p.a.
while reducing the city’s carbon footprint by an estimated
6,800t CO2 e/pa.

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Sectors:
local action
Climate Change Fund Rebates - City of Lake Macquarie Council
  • Start year:
  • Type: Fiscal / Financial mechanism
  • Status:

The New South Wales (NSW) State Government Office of
Environment and Heritage (OEH) Climate Change Fund
provided rebates for rainwater tanks, climate-friendly hot
water systems, ceiling insulation, water-efficient washing
machines, and dual-flush toilets. Lake Macquarie City rated
first in NSW for total uptake of Climate Change Fund rebates
with 14,363 rebates (ranking first for uptake of both
hot water systems and dual-flush toilets, and ranked second
for uptake of insulation). Residents also received support
from Hunter Water for showerhead exchanges, OEH for
Fridge Buyback Scheme, and OEH and the Federal Government
Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency
for solar photovoltaic installations.

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Sectors:
local action
Lake Macquarie Waterway Flooding and Tidal Inundation Policy - City of Lake Macquarie Council
  • Start year: 2012
  • Type: Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
  • Status: Completed

This policy complements Council polices regarding flood-prone
land and replaces the 2009 Sea Level Rise Preparedness
Adaptation Policy to identify and respond to emerging sea
level rise hazards and risks to foreshore properties. Council
continues to undertake flood studies, floodplain risk management
studies and plans for major catchment areas in the
City, has also reviewed its current flood information dissemination
practices, and is implementing improvements in its
flood information management system.

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Sectors:
  • Coastal zones/Marine Ecosystems
local action
Lake Macquarie Waterway Flood Risk Management Study and Plan - City of Lake Macquarie Council
  • Start year: 2011
  • Type: Policy/Strategies/Action Plans
  • Status: Completed

The effects of sea level rise on lake flooding and foreshore
inundation were estimated using computer modeling
calibrated against recorded flood events. Planning to manage
increased flood risk in 2050 and 2100 was based on
maintaining current risk threshold of the 1-in-100 year
average recurrence interval flood level. The study covers
a majority of land and settlements in the City likely to be
affected by sea level rise to 2100. It sets out management
measures to ensure there is no increase in risk to
people and property from flooding and permanent tidal
inundation, and ascertained through sensitivity testing
that other possible climate changes (including increased
storm surge and rainfall) were not considered significant
when compared to the impact of sea level rise.

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Sectors:
  • Coastal zones/Marine Ecosystems
local action
Lake Macquarie Coastal Hazard Study - City of Lake Macquarie Council
  • Start year:
  • Type: Assessment/Research
  • Status:

To update an earlier 1996 study, Council completed this
study of coastal hazards in Lake Macquarie City and incorporated
the NSW Government’s sea level rise benchmarks:
a rise of 0.4m by 2050 and 0.9m by 2100. The study includes
a risk assessment, and used a more sophisticated model
to predict the effects of underlying foreshore recession,
storm cut, beach rotation, and other coastal processes. It
also provides a suite of management actions to be considered
for inclusion in the draft Lake Macquarie Coastal
Zone Management Plan

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Sectors:
  • Coastal zones/Marine Ecosystems
local action
Inventories
Community inventories

GHG emission from City of Lake Macquarie Council
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Government operations inventory

GHG emission from City of Lake Macquarie Council
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Mayor Jodie Harrison
City of Lake Macquarie Council, Australia

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Initiative

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